THE SAGE

 

 

The Sage is a rather quirky character who just loves imparting knowledge.

 

He's there to deepen the Learner’s general knowledge on a wide range of topics.  This is done on an optional basis, though; the Sage is a key differentiation tool in the game.  Some players will be happy just to carry on with the adventure, while others will want to know about things they come across in more depth. 

 

This can happen in a number of areas:

  • Some of the characters the Learner meets in the game will be real historical figures (e.g. Tycho Brahe, the astronomer, great thinkers such as Plato or philosophers like Descartes). The Sage is a way of finding out more about those people, where they came from and what they are famous for.

  • Objects in the game can be links to deeper knowledge.  We encourage the Learner to explore their environment – clicking on things will give them more information about the object. 

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  • For instance, let’s suppose the learner has clicked on a suit of armour in the image. S/he will get some basic information about that type of armour, what it’s made of or its main uses.  However, if the Learner wants to know more, s/he can drag the Sage to the same object.  The Sage can then share information with him/her’ about a relevant subject.  Depending on the age/interests/gender of the Learner that could be something like armour through the ages; famous women in armour; what women wore at court in the period that armour was used; modern armour; mediaeval metalworking.

 

The information the Sage shares will depend on the location and activity in the game, but could be selected from a range of categories such as:

National Curriculum

characters in history (men, women, children - even animals!)

literary characters or locations

statistics (e.g. tallest/ widest/ fastest etc.)

places (modern, historical, fictional and the travellers who went there)

gory/quirky/interesting trivia à la Horrible Histories

 

"The wise man doesn't give the right answers, he poses the right questions."
Claude Levi-Strauss